Selecting the Right Hay Bag from the best Equestrian Store

Selecting the Right Hay Bag from the best Equestrian Store

Selecting the right hay bag from the equestrian store for your stallion and condition involves bearing in mind several factors. First, is your horse very fast with his feed? Or is he a slow, disciplined eater? Is your horse prone to ulcers? Is your horse overweight? Is your horse thin and has less weight? When responding to these questions, it is also important to think about where your hay bag is meant to be used. For example, if you have a heavy horse that is eager about eating, but he is susceptible to ulcers, nervous and worried when he trailers, then give him a large hay net that will be empty in a short period, parting all the hay fallen onto the floor where he can’t access it, is not ideal for extended trips.

For hay bags used in the horse trailer, it is often advisable to choose the type that has a solid lowermost surface, so the hay is reachable all over till the trip. These may not be the best hay bags from Vision Saddlery Ottawa for horses with breathing worries; however, as they must keep putting their nose into the bag in which the finite leaves, dust and particles are left. Great hay bags for the trailer, consequently, are one of the best hay bags. A great option for a horse that may have respiratory concerns is something as the horse has to work the strands of hay through the netting but can’t put his nose in and become vulnerable to the fine particles that can add to respiratory suffering.

To save hay, or to slow down a horse that either eats quickly or has ulcers and needs to eat throughout the day, minimizing any long period that he must endure without roughage intake, some horse owners or barn supervisors like to use hay bags outside. This is a good idea to get such hay bags from an equestrian store, nevertheless, there is a serious safety concern.

Hay nets from Vision Saddlery Ottawa should be tied high enough when filled, that they are still safely out of the reach of a horse’s legs when emptied. Except there are some hooks fixed to an outdoor shelter, the most common place to hang a hay net or bag outside is on the hedge. If this has to be the case, then it is overbearing that safety is considered, and there is no chance for a horse to catch his legs in the hay bag or the drawstring or hanger that it is secured from.